New arrivals:

 
Oolong Box 2018
48.00

8x 21g Sample box, introducing the three groups of Chinese Oolong or half oxidate tea comprising of Wuyi Rock tea, aged Oolong, high mountain Tieguanyin and Phoenix Dancong.

  • Distinguish fresh and aged Oolong tea, feel the floral sweetness of Dancong tea and

  • experience real high mountain Oolong from above 1.800m altitude plantations,

  • to derive a complete taste picture of Chinese Oolong tea crafts

This box provides following tea sample, each 21g enough for 3 sessions of 7g

  1. Dahongpao: a famous Wuyi rock tea variety

  2. Rougui: Cinnamon taste Wuyi rock tea variety

  3. Shuixian: the first cultivar planted in Phoenix Mt.

  4. Milan Xiang: Honey Orchrid flavor from Phoenig Mt.

  5. Tieguanyin: famous Oolong tea from Anxi in Fujian, rolled, ours is from Tengchong grown in high altitude at above 1.000m

  6. Dark Pearls: same like Tieguanyin, just longer oxidation and baking process

  7. Pomelo Fuxi: Dry aged Tieguanyin in an Pomelo, which provides a special citrus flavor

  8. Kugua Oolong: Dry aged Tieguanyin in a bitter gourd, a Hakka people special

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Yancha Box 2018
38.00

Cha-Shifu's Yancha Box offers an unique experience of Rock tea from Wuyishan. Since 2009 we visit yearly a small traditionally runed workshop of a friend, whom we  owes countless extraordinary Rock tea sessions. Each sample is 21g enough for 3 sessions of each 7g.

  • Bai Ji Guan is one of the famous four Rock tea plants of Wuyi mountains. Its leaves edge looks like a cockscomb in a white tone and taste gentle sweet nutty.

  • Da Hong Pao is the most well-known Wuyi rock tea variety and offers mineral taste combines an intensive flavors aftertaste.

  • Qi Lan is originally from Guangdong province and its orchid flower flavour is quite obvious.

  • Que She is counts to the small leaf category and tastes smooth with thick fruity flavour.

  • Rou Gui is one to the typical representative tea of the rock tea family. Its famous for its intense and versatile flavor of cinnamon.

  • Shui Xian is the origin of Wuyi rock tea, famous for its thick & pure mineral taste, ours here got some nice Orchid flower flavor, too.

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Dancong box 2018
38.00

A selection of Dancong teas, a famous Oolong Rock tea variety growing at Phoenix Mountain, Northern Guangdong province, Shouth China.

All teas are harvested at Phonix or Wudong Mt. in March or April of 2018, each 21g, enough for 3 sessions of each 7g

  1. Milan Xiang Honey Orchid: Strong flavor and sweet taste.

  2. Wuye Dark Leaf: Fresh sweetness and thick mouth feeling.

  3. Duck Shit: Thick sweetness and complexity.

  4. Shuixian: The original, thick sweetness in your mouth.

  5. Huangzhi Orange: Thick complex sweetness, altitude Shiguping ~950m.

  6. Wolong: 1980’ies a farmer planted Tieguanyin in Shiguping village, floral sensation was created

For best Dancong experience you fill up the pot with the leaf and wash them first. Now the pot is half filled with the leafs and you start by pouring the leafs with boiling water and infusion time not more than 3 or 5 seconds.

You easily can repeat 12 or more times, spring harvested Dancong from Phonix Mt is very long lasting. 

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  taste
  tea & tools
  travel
 
 

How do we taste and what is the taste of tea at all?

Taste or gustatory perception is one of the five traditional senses and we perceive with small taste buds on our tongue sensory impression of five basic tastes.

Taste of tea in the sense of beverage from poured water over dried leaves or buds of camellia sinensis varies greatly, common tastes are a bit bitter, slightly sweet and enjoyable umami.

Taste or gustatory perception is one of the five traditional senses and with small taste buds on our tongue we have the sensory impression of five basic tastes.

Fresh tea leaves contain between 25-35% of Phenols, mainly Epigallocatechin Gallate EGCG, a potent antioxidant, which provides green tea bitterness, whereas in black tea more tannins contains leading to its typical silky astringency. Tea of old trees absorb minerals from tree's deep roots and therefore we perceive slightly salty taste.

Which qualities of tea we taste and how we classify them?

Out of basic tastes, further sensations can be defined like astringency, camphor, floral and others. Actually we taste not exclusively by our mouth, rather using a set of sensory impressions like texture, fragrance, temperature and appearance.

The interaction of these impressions while tasting tea, reminds us of enjoying a drupe, nuts, smokey bacon - you name it.

To make interactive impressions of different teas sessions comparable, wine enthusiasts developed a recognized tool, a so called "Aroma Wheel of Wine".
We have derived an equivalent for tea sessions and tried it many times with our portfolio and confirm - yes it let us easily describe tea session to one another.
In a further step we developed three basic questions, answer them by ticking your taste expectations and as a query result get a short list of suitable teas out of Cha-Shifu's selection.

aroma wheel of tea by cha-shifu.jpg

Are you interested in Chinese tea or do you want to deepen your way of tea?

Helping you to explore your “Chádào - Way of tea”, we selected a starter box, comprising of 6 samples from traditional Chinese tea and useful tools. Each sample is enough to experience 3 or 4 tea sessions and will provide you a profound access to Chinese tea. For successful tea preparation following the authentic "Gongfu" or two pots method, an easy to use tool set completes "Introduction to Chinese tea".


In a second step further selections will provide you a profound taste understanding of:

  • High Mountain garden Raw Pu-erh vs. Plantation tea of Menghai
  • Dark and Ripe Pu-erh vs. Chinese Red tea or Westerners Black tea
  • Green tea vs. White and Yellow tea
  • The three groups of Chinese Oolong tea
  • The 12 Classic blends recipes of Menghai tea factory by Dayi
  • Ripeness from fresh to semi-aged to aged Pu-erh tea
 
 
I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best.
— Oscar Wilde
Where there’s tea there’s hope.
— Arthur Wing Pinero
 

 

What teas Cha-Shifu offers and which one fits my taste best?

Our expertise comprises of premium tea from the origin of tea in today's Yunnan and all over China. All kind of tea grow from Camellia Sinensis, its processing makes the difference. 

When it comes to choose the right teapot for releasing the flavor of a kind or group of tea leaves in an optimized way, you should be clear about:

  • For how many people, I make tea normally - size?
  • For which kind of tea I'm searching a teapot - shape, surface?
 
When it comes to choose the right teapot for releasing the flavor of a kind or group of tea leaves in an optimized way, you should be clear about:      For how many people, I make tea normally? "Size question"     Which kind of tea I'm searching a teapot? "Shape question"     Which flavor group of tea should be enhanced? "Material question"
When it comes to choose the right teapot for releasing the flavor of a kind or group of tea leaves in an optimized way, you should be clear about which shape and material enhances.jpg

Typically different materials influence the taste of tea. A tea taster uses a porcelain set for comparing different teas, because of porcelaine smooth surface taste won't be influenced.

 

 

Where does tea comes from and who cultivates tea?

The tea plant Camellia sinensis was found in today's Southwest China, Yunnan province and its neighboring regions of Northeast Myanmar as well as Indias Assam region, Camellia sinensis var assamica. Today there are still some wild tea forests in Yunnan, Camellia taliensis, but the vast majority of tea is cultivated in gardens in China south of Yellow River, India, Kenya, Sri Lanka and Turkey to name the top 5 producers.

map tea plant Camellia sinensis found in Southwest China, Yunnan province and its neighboring regions of Northeast Myanmar as well as Indias Assam region, Camellia sinens.jpg

Particular in Yunnan, Pu'er tea is cultivated by minorities of Dai, Bulang and Hani, whereas in rest of Chinas tea gardens with its Green, Red (Black), Yellow, White and Oolong tea plantations are cultivated by Han people.

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